Fork-tailed Sunbird

Fork-tailed Sunbird



In my impression, I realized that there are fork-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga christinae) in Kinmen not long after I took a fowl, and I have consistently been exceptionally intrigued by this kind of flying plume. Afterward, I got some flying creature news in a steady progression. Since the time was in December, I erroneously felt that the fork-tailed sunbird was a travel feathered creature or a winter transitory fledgling. The first occasion when I went to Kinmen was in June. I heard the proprietor of the inn referenced that the fork-tailed sunbird is an occupant fowl, so I went to check the outline book and it was actually an inhabitant flying creature. I started to ask why everybody decided to shoot in December? 


Fork-tailed Sunbird

fork-tailed sunbird is about 8~10 cm long, very little bigger than the green pecker, and is an uncommon inhabitant winged creature in Kinmen. 

Fork-tailed Sunbird

Its attributes incorporate earthy colored iris, dark snout and long and downturned, dim earthy colored feet; male fledgling is flawless, blue-green on the head with metallic radiance, dull earthy colored cheeks, red throat and chest, white tummy with olive green, back and wings Grayish green, yellow midsection, splendid green tail quills, with two slender projecting plumes, and white plumes under the tail. 

Fork-tailed Sunbird

The head and back of the female are grayish-green, with unnoticeable obscured eyeliner and deficient yellowish eye circles, the body is generally yellowish green, the abdomen is light yellow, the flight quills and tail plumes are dark green, and the tail quills are additionally white. 

Likewise, I think winged animal companions presumably additionally comprehend what I said toward the start, the fowl updates on the fork-tailed sunbird is in December. This is obviously in light of the fact that fork-tailed sunbird is bound to show up in places with nectar, and fledgling darlings lean toward the shooting condition of red house blossoms and powder puff blossoms.


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