Blue Whistling-Thrush

A whistling thrush found in the mountains of Central Asia , South Asia, China and Southeast Asia is the blue whistling-thrush (Myophonus caeruleus). It is recognized at dawn and dusk for its loud human-like whistling music. With some of them regarded as subspecies, the widely distributed populations exhibit differences in size and plumage. They feed on the ground, sometimes along streams and in moist areas, like others in the genus, foraging for snails, crabs, fruit and insects.


Blue Whistling-Thrush


Usually, the blue whistling thrush is found alone or in pairs. In short spurts, they jump on rocks and run around. They turn leaves and tiny stones over, cocking their heads and watching for prey movements. They spread and drop their tails when frightened. 

They are active long after dusk and appear to sing in the darkness of dawn and dusk during the breeding season ( April to August) when few other birds call. During November, the call precedes sunrise the most. The nest is a cup of moss and roots placed beside a stream, in a ledge or hollow. 

Blue Whistling-Thrush


The normal clutch consists of 3 to 4 eggs, with a second brood often raised by the couple. Fruits, earthworms, spiders, crabs and snails feed on them. Until feeding, snails and crabs are usually battered on a rock. They have been known to kill and eat mice in captivity and have been recorded in the wild preying on small birds.

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