Orange-Headed Thrush

The orange-headed thrush (Geokichla citrina) is a bird In the thrush family. In well-wooded areas of the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia, it is popular. Many neighborhoods are inhabited. The species demonstrates a preference for shady damp areas, and can be very secretive, like many Zoothera thrushes.


Orange-Headed Thrush


The orange-headed thrush is omnivorous, eating a large variety of insects, earthworms and berries. It nests but does not form flocks in trees.


Orange-Headed Thrush



The male of this small thrush has uniform grey upperparts, and an orange head and underparts. The females and young birds have browner upper parts.


The orange-headed thrush is a shy, hidden bird that normally occurs alone or in pairs, but is relatively easier to see than several other thrushes of the Zoothera, and many birds can congregate at a good food source outside the breeding season. It has a fast, quiet flight, but also sits motionless when disturbed until the danger has passed.


A gentle "chuk or tchuk", a screeching "teer-teer", and a thin "tsee or dzef" provided in flight are calls of the orange-headed thrush. 


Orange-Headed Thrush



However, particularly in winter, this bird is typically silent. The song is a loud, simple sequence of variably sweet lilting musical notes, reminiscent of the common blackbird 's consistency, but with the song thrush's more repeated structure. Imitations of other birds such as bulbuls, babblers and common tailorbirds are also included. In a leafy oak, it sings from a perch, often early in the morning and late afternoon.


Post a Comment

Copyright © Birdoftheworld: All About Beautiful Birds From Around The World.